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In this blog, we will focus on a neglected component of antenatal care (ANC) and point at figures and facts usually not highlighted by the National Demographic Household Surveys (DHS) based on results from the Addressing social, cultural and historical factors limiting the contribution of medical laboratory services to...

Worldwide over 30 middle-income countries are responding to the need for Universal Health Coverage following the inception of the global Universal Health coverage movement. In 2005, this movement led the World Health Assembly to call on countries to develop their health systems, so that all people have access to affordable service.

This truncation of the expression shares experiences from 12 Francophone countries on the transition from scheme to system including setbacks in achieving universal coverage. This evaluation was conducted by the Alliance for Health systems and policy...

Whether you are a patient at a health facility or someone visiting a loved-one receiving health service at a public health facility in Ghana, you may not escape the discussion regarding patient experiences of poor health worker attitudes. In previous blogs, Dr. Elizabeth Ekirapa-Kiracho and Rornald Muhumuza Kananura took us through the issue of poor health worker attitude and some reasons why some patients opt for services elsewhere, rather than at public health facilities. My attempt in this blog is to take the discussion that Dr. Ekirapa-Kiracho started on the health worker workload a...

Have you ever imagined how critical communities are in ensuring quality of care for in health service delivery?  For the month of November, we were privileged to read from the CoHeRe team based in Ghana about the importance of balancing the client-perceived quality and the technical quality of care in health services delivery.   Involving clients in monitoring contracted health facilities and awarding best performing facilities was one strategy that CoHeRe used to realize the balance between client-perceived quality and technical quality of care. Read on here for the ...
In a previous blog on this website, David Walugembe  showed the importance of engaging the communities in health research. From my perspective, I would like to address the same issue from another angle and show that engaging communities is key for impacting a policy, a project or a social program. I would also like to discuss at what stage of the process engaging communities is possible since the level of community engagement in the formulation process will define its success or failure. In their book , Margaret...

Every woman has the right to dignified and respectful care during pregnancy and delivery. This is a recent declaration from WHO, issued in September 2014, and already endorsed by dozens of national and international organizations (1). Do you agree with that?

For the past twenty years, women have been strongly encouraged to deliver in health facilities, with skilled health staff. However, women do not always find the care they expected and were told they would get. In his...

Many researchers before Avedis Donabedian (2005) claimed the concept of quality in healthcare could not be defined in concrete objective terms because it is practically challenging to apply it in the health services industry.  In more recent times, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) stated that quality care is “the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge”. The IOM (2001) proposed that high quality should be:

Safe – avoiding injuries to patients from the care...

It is with pleasure that I give a summary of the maiden theme based blogs for the month of October. We were privileged to read from members of  the KTNET Africa secretariat, partners and a guest bloggers. 

The writers centered on health worker attitude, effective engagement of communities and health financing. In her blog titled ‘’Who is to blame for the Poor Health Workers Attitudes and how can we cure this Disease?’’ Dr. Elizabeth Ekirapa gave...

In the previous blog (Who is to blame for the Poor Health Workers Attitudes and how can we cure This Disease) by Dr. Elizabeth Ekirapa-Kiracho, it was indicated that some women have opted to give birth at home rather than face the wrath of health workers.  This is true. In this blog, I will share with you maternal and newborn challenges based on the experience from the implementation of maternal and newborn care project in rural communities of Uganda. The information is based on community and health workers' voices. In the last blog the author pointed out Health workers attitude as one of...

Few things capture essential principles and place matters in perspective like a good African proverb. There’s one that cautions in essence that there are three sides to every story – your side, my side, and the truth. Another advises ‘do not look out for where you fell, but where you slipped.’ With growing attention to health workers’ attitudes, these proverbs highlight the importance of perspective when considering health workforce issues.

Since 2009, Ghana and other malaria-endemic countries have adopted a test-before-treat approach for malaria, based on revised World Health...

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